Cecil Loneragan, 18841944 (aged 60 years)

Name
Cecil /Loneragan/
Given names
Cecil
Surname
Loneragan
Birth 1884 34

Death of a motherBridget Heaton
August 31, 1884 (aged 0)
Note: DEATHS

DEATHS LONERAGAN. - At the residence of her brother, Mr. Edward Heaton, 128 Botany-street, Moore Park, Bridget, the beloved wife of Mr. James Loneragan, Mudgee, aged 34 years, leaving a sorrowing husband and seven children to mourn their loss. R.I.P. Sydney Morning Herald, Tuesday 2 September 1884, p. 1. Bridget Loneragan Death

Death of a fatherJames Loneragan
July 15, 1914 (aged 30 years)

Note: DEATH OF MR. JAMES L0NERAGAN.

DEATH OF MR. JAMES L0NERAGAN. MUDGEE, Thursday. Mr. James Loneragan, founder of the firm of Messrs. James Loneragan, Ltd., of Mudgee and Gulgong, died suddenly after retiring to bed last night. He had been at business as usual during the day. Deceased was 68 years of age. He was born at Bathurst, and left school at an early age. He then entered the employ of Messrs. Wright, Heaton, and Co., and managed that firm 's Wallerawang branch for some years. Later on he opened a produce business at Wallerawang. He then established his store, and after some time he opened branches at Caportee and Lithgow. About two years before the opening of the railway to Mudgee he came to this town and opened a store. Later on he moved into the present premises. The building was enlarged and improved, until today it is one of the largest and finest store premises in the west and north-west. In April, 1902, he purchased the big Gulgong store from C. K. Young. This was further evidence of his foresight, because the railway line was built to Gulgong from Mudgee shortly afterwards, and when the railway line continued to Dunedoo he also established a big store there. Deceased was always interested in flour milling. He managed the mill in Mudgee for some years, eventually selling out to the Great Western Milling Co. He built at Gul gong one of the most up-to-date mills in the State. Besides a widow, deceased leaves the following sons and daughters: - Edward Loneragan, manager of the Mudgee branch of the firm; Richard Loneragan, manager of the machinery and produce departments of the Mudgee branch; the Rev. Cecil Loneragan, Bathurst; Frank Loneragan, Queensland; and Louis Loneragan, Mudgee; Mrs. W. B. Spruson, Sydney; and Mrs. Langton, Sydney. Deceased was for many years an alderman in the Mudgee Council. The body will be brought to Mudgee tomorrow night, and the funeral will leave St. Mary's R.C. Church at 11.30 on Saturday morning. The business premises and shops here were all draped today, and flags are flying half-mast. Lithgow Mercury, Friday 17 July 1914, p. 4. James Loneragan Obituary

Note: Appreciations

Appreciations THE LATE JAMES LONERAGAN. (By J. G., Dubbo.) Lives of great men all remind us We can make our lives sublime, And departing leave behind us Footprints on the sands of time. Footprints that perhaps another, Sailing o'er life's solemn main, A forlorn and shipwrecked brother, Seeing, shall take heart again. Ripe in years and rich in esteem of his fellowmen, James Loneragan has passed to the reward which awaits a well-spent life. He was a great man, regard him how one will. The examples which he set will have a moral, inspiring, and sustaining effect on many who knew, and certainly on all who possess the innate qualities for good which he developed and used with so much advantage to the world of his term. His memory will be kept green and his name honored till at least all the present generations have gone the way of all flesh. He was, indeed, the prototype of Longfellow's ideal when he wrote his “Psalm of Life” and the verses quoted above. James Loneragan was certainly a great man - one who stood out conspicuously as a great man of his time. And his exemplary life will be an example to many a weary pilgrim of life, and an incentive to the youth and adolescence who knew him to make him their paragon, his life their ideal. Longfellow's words were truly spoken, but we are apt to unheed them, except when we review the lives of great man like James Loneragan. Among the workings of the hidden life within us, which we may experience but cannot explain, are there any more remarkable than those mysterious moral influences constantly exercised either for attraction or repulsion, by one human being over another. In the simplest as in the most important affairs of life, how startling, how irresistible is their power! No human being can come into this world without increasing or diminishing the sum total of human happiness, not only at the present, but at every subsequent age of humanity. No one can detach himself from this connection. There is no sequestered spot in the universe, no dark niche, along the disc of non-existence, to which he can retreat from his relation to others, ? where he can withdraw the influence of his existence upon the moral destiny of the world; everywhere his presence or his absence will be felt - everywhere he will have companions who will be better or worse for his influence. The truth of this dogma is apparent. In our every-day existence we see it verified. And when we ponder the life of the late James Loneragan, all who knew him will admit that he was a great man, that his influence has affected his contemporaries for good, and such influence will therefore transcend to generations to come. My acquaintance with Mr. Loneragan extends back to the days of my childhood. I well remember being brought under his notice by my father and the kindly reception I got. Years rolled on, and in my duties as a pressman I became associated with him in a combined endeavor to further the interests of the district in which we labored in our respective spheres. I was admitted to his inmost counsels; I was treated with his confidences; I was able to discover his wealth of reasoning, his fund of purpose, the self-sacrifice he was ever ready to make to accomplish a public good. I would be lacking of any powers of observation could I not notice the utter unselfishness of the man, his sincerity, his kindness, his bonhomie, and the purity of the soul within him. Truly, James Loneragan was a great man, and his life must remind us that we can make our lives sublime. And though we may write eulogisms of' him, I can not help thinking that the most eloquent references to his character and fine personality, are the simple words, 'A grand man.' 'A fine man,' by which I often heard him referred by enthusiastic and grateful hearts who had participated in his generosity or benefited by his advices. I repeat that the life of James Loneragan showed, and will be an inspiration to many. And what is the history of that life? What was the cause of his great success? Why was he so universally admired ? From my personal acquaintance with him, from what I learned of him, and from what I observed in him, I am able to answer these questions. James Loneragan was essentially a self-made man. He was not born into the world with the proverbial silver spoon in his mouth. But he had the priceless heritage of a stout heart, courage and determination, will power and general strength of character. As a youth, at the outset of his career, he formed the solemn purpose to make the most and the best of the powers which God had given him, and to turn to the best possible account every outward advantage within his reach. This purpose carried with it the assent of reason, the approval of the conscience, and the sober judgment of the intellect. It embodied within itself whatever was vehement in desire, inspiring in hope, thrilling in enthusiasm, and intense in desperate resolve. Such a plan saved him from many a damaging contest with temptations, and it regulated his recreations. It went with him by day to trample under foot the allurements of pleasure, and it held his eyes waking as he toiled by the evening lamp; it watched over his slumbers, to jog him at the appointed hours, and summoned him to the cheerful duties of his chosen pursuit. Thus it was that, laboring under the inspiration of such a purpose, he soon soared out of sight of those who barely allowed themselves to be carried along by the momentum of the machinery to which they were attached. What art inspiration, then, must be the life of this great man to those who in present dis position would pass through life without even a consciousness of where they are and what they are doing! Will they, of themselves, heed the lesson which the life of James Loneragan teaches? If not, will those in authority over them remind them of the Gospel which they fail to hear, and thus save them from themselves. Teach them to take the life of this great man - to take it just as it was - an earnest, vital, essential affair - to take it as though they were born to personally emulate it, - as though the world had waited for their coming. And let us all regard it as it was - the seizure of every opportunity to do and to achieve, to carry forward great and good schemes; to help and to cheer the suffering, the weary - it may be the brokenhearted - brother. The fact is life is undervalued by a great majority of mankind. It is not made half as much of as should be the case. Now and then a man, like James Loneragan, stands aside from the crowd, labors incessantly, steadfastly, confidently, and straightway becomes famous for wisdom, intellect, capacity for good citizenship, and all round greatness, either actual or relative. The world wonders, admires, and yet it only illustrates what each may do to make his own life sublime, if he only, like James Loneragan, takes hold of life with a purpose. One way is right to go. The hero sees it and moves on that aim, and has the world under him for foot and support. His approbation is honor; his dissent infamy. The life of James Loneragan emphasises that man was sent into the world to be a growing and exhaustless force. The world was spread around him to be seized and conquered. Realms of infinite trust burst open above him, inviting him to tread those shining coasts along which Newtown dropped his plummet and Herschel sailed - a Columbus of the skies. James Loneragan was a man of indomitable will. His power of purpose and will took hold of the heart of his life. It spanned his whole manhood. It entered into his hopes, aims, and prospects. It held its sceptre over his business, his amusements, his philosophy, his religion. This indomitable, this in flexible purpose, looking for the future good through temporary reverses, always begot confidence and commanded success. And here again his life reaches an effective sermon - indicating how the opposite qualities have as truly led to timid resolves, uncertain councils, alternate exaltation and depression, and final disappointment and disaster - how a vacillating policy, irresolute councils, unstable will, subordination of the future to the present, efforts to relieve ourselves from existing trouble without providing against its recurrence, may bring momentary quiet, but but expose us to greater disquiet than ever, hereafter. Many, no doubt, have referred to James Loneragan as a lucky man. But his success in life was not due to giddy chance or fickle fate. On the contrary, he attained eminences a man by sheer force of merit. He distanced his fellow-man because he mastered his business, preserved his integrity, lived cleanly and purely, devoted his leisure hours to the acquisition of knowledge, and gained friends and admirers by deserving them. There are some ways to fortune shorter than this old dusty highway, - but the staunch men of the community, like James Loneragan, the men who achieve something really worth having, good fortune and serene age, all go on this road. James Loneragan was one who as a mere boy was compelled to work, and who, when a little older, was under the stern necessity of doing a little more, than his legitimate share of labor; who as a young man had his wits sharpened by having to devise ways and means of making his time more available than it could, be under ordinary circumstances. His youth was passed in the practice of self-denials of rest and recreation. But his determination to succeed, and the pleasing vista of the future which his sunny

(Photo) The Late Mr. James Loneragan. (Photo) Bearing the Remains of the Late Mr. James Loneragan from St. Mary's Church, Mudgee

optimism pictured, made his labor not only light, but a perennial source of pleasure. The habit of industry thus acquired never deserted him, and he died in harness. And, indeed, his was an industrious life, he sat up late, he rose early, to the performance of duties, doing by daylight the work of one man and by night that of another. And here, another lesson from his life. Let not any youth be discouraged, if he has to make his own living, for this had been the road to the eminence which James Loneragan attained. This was his path, which many great men had to tread thorny enough at times, at others so beset with obstacles as to be almost impassable; but when the way was cleared sunshine came, success followed, and then glory and renown, and and now a, name, and a memory that, will be Honored and revered, even by future generations. As an employer, he was just and generous. He waited not for the compulsion of the law to pay good wages. Years before the shop assistants award was declared he was paying his hands much higher wages than the award demanded. And to the employees, especially the younger ones, he showed a fatherly interest. It was not an uncommon thing for him to give bonuses to honest lads on Saturdays, and when they, as new to the honor, reminded him that he was giving too much, he would give them a knowing and kindly smile, and tell them to ask no questions. A good employee found him an exemplary master. But, trained in the stern school of a strenuous experience, and being a man of undeviating rectitude, he could tolerate no scheming nor dishonesty. His religion was to him a source of true felicity. It gave him peace and contentment, divested his heart of anxious cares; and shed unmingled and perpetual sunshine into his life. He regarded true religion - no matter the creed, as the foundation of| society. He didn't parade his religion. He was just as earnest in it, just as sincere in it, but just as unobtrusive in it as, he was in discharging the duties appertaining to his mundane affairs. It is needless to say, then, that he was tolerant of the religious convictions of all who didn't worship at the same shrine as himself; but he always admired and trusted the good churchman. James Loneragan, as a citizen, was known beyond the confines of the Mudgee and western districts, even unto the utmost limits of the State. Indeed, citizenship was religion to him. Its duties insistently called to him, and he never sought to disobey or to shirk the responsibility. As a public man he was forceful, if not eloquent, in argument. He was inclined to be a little prolix, but this was the outcome of his sincerity. Whatever cause or public movement had the support of James Loneragan had a mighty motive power to urge it on. In public polity he was farseeing and resolute in his purpose. He was not deterred by the considerations of personal friendship nor the fears of public hostility. What he conceived to be right he fought for with all the determination and dogged perseverance of which he possessed a big fund. More than once he stood almost alone, but he went bravely on, breaking down the barriers of opposition and hostility, resolutely moving to the consummation of his projects, and eventually he succeeded. The history of his agitation for the extension of the railway from Mudgee and the opposition thereto affords an instance in point. In the greatest tumults of verbal warfare, in the face of relentless opposition, he was ever the gentleman, well contained, by reason ,of his dignity, which he would not sacrifice even to gain a purpose which was dear to him. I have seen him ordered to resume his seat in the Mudgee Council, and though he knew the order was not sanctioned by right or the recognised methods of procedure, he would quietly say, 'Very well, Mr. Mayor; I bow to your ruling. Jas Loneragan was essentially a true gentleman,- gentle, modest, courteous, slow to take offence, as being one who never gave it. He was slow to surmise evil as being one who never thought it. As a gentleman, he sub jected his appetites,refined his tastes, subdued his feelings, and controlled his speech. As a gentleman, he deemed every other as good as, if not better than himself. Summarising, I may say of the character and methods of this great man for whom we all now mourn: He relied not upon others; there was in his own breast a calm, deep, decided, and all-pervading principle. He looked first, midst, and last to God to aid him in the great task before him, and then he planted his foot on the right. He let others live as they pleased, tainted by low tastes or debasing passions. He tried to be the salt of the earth, incorrupt in his deeds, in his inmost thoughts thoughts and feelings. Nay, more; incorruptible like virtue herself; his manners blameless; his views of duty not narrow, false and destructive, but a savor of life to all around him. His speech was always savored with grace, seasoned with the salt of truth, honor, manliness, and benevolence. Vale, James Loneragan! Though dead to life to memory dear! Thus Mr. E. J. Gamgee, once editor of the Mudgee 'Guardian,' and now sub-editor of the Newcastle 'Morning Herald': - I was most shocked when I read of the death of James Loneragan. He was in many respects a very remarkable man. I was always impressed with the view that he had a very strong sense of justice, and he certainly had great force of character. It is a loss to the whole community to lose a man of his type, for he was the class of man who makes Australia. (Photo) THE BEGINNING OF THE FUNERAL CORTEGE

Mudgee Guardian, Thursday 23 July 1914, p. 20. James Loneragan Obituary

Burial of a fatherJames Loneragan
July 18, 1914 (aged 30 years)
Military
Enlisted
September 30, 1916 (aged 32 years)

Death of a brotherRichard Patrick Joseph Loneragan
1939 (aged 55 years)

Death of a brotherFrancis James Loneragan
August 3, 1942 (aged 58 years)

Note: DEATHS

DEATHS Mr. F. J. Loneragan Passes The death occurred at his late residence in Mortimer Street, Mudgee this morning of Mr. Francis James (Frank) Loneragan aged 63 years. Deceased had been ailing for about two years, and for some months had been confined to his room. He is survived by a widow, two sons and one daughter, also the following brothers and sisters: Mr. J. E. Loneragan (Mudgee), Mr. L. Loneragan (Sydney), Father Cecil Loneragan (Canowindra), Mesdames Langton (Putta Bucca) and Spruson (Sydney). After a Requiem Mass at St. Mary's Church tomorrow (Tuesday) morning, the funeral will take place to the local cemetery, Messrs. J. C. Swords and Son being in charge of arrangements. An extended notice will appear in Thursday's "Guardian." Mudgee Guardian, Monday 3 August 1942, p. 8. Francis Loneragan Obituary

Note: THE LATE FRANK LONERAGAN

THE LATE FRANK LONERAGAN A Gallant Soldier and Fine Citizen Whole District Mourns The passing of Francis James Frank Loneragan briefly referred to in Monday's "Guardian" brought deep sorrow to many homes in Mudgee and district, where he was well known and highly esteemed. Born in Mudgee 63 years ago, he was a member of one pioneer business family, and it can be truly said that his life was full of honorable endeavor. He received his early tuition locally, and then went on to St. Ignatius, Riverview, where he acquired the knowledge which stood him in such good stead throughout a busy, useful life. Finishing his ?-cholr..s;:c career he returned to follow in the business footsteps of other members of the family. He was for a period connected with the Gulgong branch of Loneragan's, and later took control at Dunedoo, where he remained for many years. In the neighboring town he linked himself with practically all progressive movement, and was a ??? in the now famous Show Society. It was only natural that a man of his courage and ability should branch out in other directions, and during his term at Dunedoo he acquired control of the well-known Kurrajong Station property, near Tooraweenah, which he successfully operated in conjunction with his other business. When war set the world aflame in 1914, the late Frank Loneragan, in common with other gallant boys, answered the call to arms and, with the Royal Field Artillery, British Imperial Forces, he gave the best that was in him. It might here be mentioned that his brother, Father Cecil Loneragan, was a padre with the A.I.F. abroad. Being a man with a keen liking for the land, it was only natural that, on his return to Mudgee, he should acquire a property, and the old-established Wallinga Estate passed into his hands. In association with the late James Pirie, he worked a transformation out there. He later secured a splendid pastoral property at Pyramul, and some time before his last illness he made arrangements for the erection of a fine home on the estate, intending to settle down there. The fates, however, willed otherwise. During his lengthy residence at Wallinga he threw himself heart and soul into the work of advancing the interests of the district of which he was so proud. He was one of the most active members of the Mudgee Graziers' Association, and for a considerable period filled the presidential chair with marked ability. As an old member remarked this week, he was certainly one of the best presidents of all time. But it was, perhaps, as president of the Mudgee Agricultural Society that Frank Loneragan performed some of his most successful work. With characteristic thoroughness he set about improving the conditions on the show ground, and the latest innovations are in a large measure due to his unbounded enthusiasm. He had the confidence of every member of the organisation, and they delighted in working under his leadership. As a returned soldier, he naturally drifted into close association with the Mudgee branch of Diggers, and was unanimously chosen to carry out president. His fine personality made a great impression on the fighting lad, and they were proud to carry on under his command. It may here be mentioned that his worthy wife also interested herself very actively in the affairs of the returned men, and rendered real service to her life partner and to the organisation in which he took a just pride. He also found time to interest himself in the affairs of the Mudgee Pastures Protection Board and, as a director, he gave valuable service. His worth was also recognised by the Royal Automobile Club of Australia, of which powerful organisation he was made a country vice-president. Frank Loneragan was one of nature's gentlemen who, by his kindly, charitable disposition, won and held the love and esteem of an army of friends. They deeply deplore his lamentable passing, and will ever hold his memory in reverence. To the sorrowing widow and family and other relatives the deepest sympathy of the whole of our citizens will be extended. The funeral, which took place on Tuesday morning, was large and representative of all classes of the community. A solemn Requiem Mass was celebrated in St. Mary's Church by the Rev. Father Loneragan (brother), of Canowindra, and also present were Monsignor Flanagan, Dr. Duffy and Father Cass. After the ceremony the cortege proceeded to the Catholic portion of the Mudgee Cemetery, ? Monsignor Flanagan officiated. The coffin was draped with the Union Jack. Old and trusted employees of deceased, in the persons of Messrs. Croake Bros., Metcalfe and Akhurst, acted as pallbearers. In the funeral procession marched employees of Loneragan, members of other business firms, and returned soldiers, while others present included very many who had been associated with deceased in his long and honorable public ?. Francis also forwarded many beautiful floral tributes. At the conclusion of the religious service, Mr. Stan. Searle sounded "The Last Post." Mudgee Guardian, Thursday 6 August 1942, p. 14. Francis Loneragan Obituary

Death January 4, 1944 (aged 60 years)

Note: DEATH

DEATH Rev. Fr. Loneragan The news of the death of the Very Rev. Father Cecil Loneragan, parish priest of Canowindra, which took place on Tuesday last at Canowindra, will come as a painful shock to his relatives and friends and to all who knew him. The deceased priest had been in failing health for the past few years, but it was only within the last few months that the malady he suffered from, which was an acute form of heart disease, became accentuated. He suffered a violent attack last Sunday from which he never recovered and passed to his eternal reward shortly after midday on Tuesday. Father Loneragan was born at Mudgee 60 years ago, and belonged to one of the best-known and esteemed families of the district. Mr. Edward Loneragan, principal of the well-known firm of Jas. Loneragan and Co., Mudgee, and Mr. Louis Loneragan (Sydney) are brothers, and Mrs. Langton (Putta Bucca) and Mrs. Spruson (Sydney) are sisters. He was educated at St. Matthew's Convent, Mudgee; St. Ignatius' College, Riverview; St. Patrick's Manly; Propaganda College, Rome; and All Hallows' College, Dublin, Ireland, where he was ordained to the priesthood on June 24, 1907. Returning to his native land he commenced work in the Bathurst Diocese in February, 1908, and since then has labored in Wellington and in Bathurst, where he was Administrator of the Cathedral for some years. He was appointed parish priest at Coonabarabran in 1928 and was transferred to Canowindra in 1931, following the death of Father Cooney. He was a military chaplain during the last war, volunteering for service while he was at Bathurst. He spent three years overseas with the Australian forces. Father Loneragan's death removes from the ranks of the Bathurst clergy a great priest and a highly cultured man. A Solemn Requiem Mass will be celebrated for the repose of his soul at St. Edward's Church, Canowindra, on Friday morning at 10 o'clock. His Lordship, Dr. Norton, will be the celebrant. The funeral will take place immediately afterwards to Mudgee, where the remains will be laid to rest with those of his father and mother in the family burying ground. Mudgee Guardian, Thursday 6 January 1944, p. 8. Cecil Loneragan Obituary

Family with parents
father
mother
Marriage Marriage1873
1 year
elder brother
2 years
elder sister
18741956
Birth: 1874 24
Death: October 10, 19569 Chanel Road, Vaucluse, New South Wales, Australia
3 years
elder brother
3 years
elder brother
3 years
elder sister
18801953
Birth: 1880 30
Death: October 11, 195314 Mount Street, Hunter's Hill, New South Wales, Australia
3 years
elder brother
18821950
Birth: 1882 32
Death: May 15, 195029 Chamberlain Avenue, Rose Bay, New South Wales, Australia
3 years
himself
18841944
Birth: 1884 34
Death: January 4, 1944
Death

DEATH Rev. Fr. Loneragan The news of the death of the Very Rev. Father Cecil Loneragan, parish priest of Canowindra, which took place on Tuesday last at Canowindra, will come as a painful shock to his relatives and friends and to all who knew him. The deceased priest had been in failing health for the past few years, but it was only within the last few months that the malady he suffered from, which was an acute form of heart disease, became accentuated. He suffered a violent attack last Sunday from which he never recovered and passed to his eternal reward shortly after midday on Tuesday. Father Loneragan was born at Mudgee 60 years ago, and belonged to one of the best-known and esteemed families of the district. Mr. Edward Loneragan, principal of the well-known firm of Jas. Loneragan and Co., Mudgee, and Mr. Louis Loneragan (Sydney) are brothers, and Mrs. Langton (Putta Bucca) and Mrs. Spruson (Sydney) are sisters. He was educated at St. Matthew's Convent, Mudgee; St. Ignatius' College, Riverview; St. Patrick's Manly; Propaganda College, Rome; and All Hallows' College, Dublin, Ireland, where he was ordained to the priesthood on June 24, 1907. Returning to his native land he commenced work in the Bathurst Diocese in February, 1908, and since then has labored in Wellington and in Bathurst, where he was Administrator of the Cathedral for some years. He was appointed parish priest at Coonabarabran in 1928 and was transferred to Canowindra in 1931, following the death of Father Cooney. He was a military chaplain during the last war, volunteering for service while he was at Bathurst. He spent three years overseas with the Australian forces. Father Loneragan's death removes from the ranks of the Bathurst clergy a great priest and a highly cultured man. A Solemn Requiem Mass will be celebrated for the repose of his soul at St. Edward's Church, Canowindra, on Friday morning at 10 o'clock. His Lordship, Dr. Norton, will be the celebrant. The funeral will take place immediately afterwards to Mudgee, where the remains will be laid to rest with those of his father and mother in the family burying ground. Mudgee Guardian, Thursday 6 January 1944, p. 8. Cecil Loneragan Obituary