Harold Edgar Carlisle, 18681935 (aged 67 years)

Name
Harold Edgar /Carlisle/
Given names
Harold Edgar
Surname
Carlisle
Birth 1868

Birth of a daughterGrace Elizabeth Carlisle
1896 (aged 28 years)

Birth of a sonCecil Edgar Carlisle
1900 (aged 32 years)

Birth of a sonAlbert Harold Carlisle
1903 (aged 35 years)

Birth of a daughterCelma Jane Carlisle
1905 (aged 37 years)

Birth of a sonJohn Thomas Carlisle
1907 (aged 39 years)

Lightning January 30, 1908 (aged 40 years)

Note: Struck by Lightning.

Struck by Lightning.

Shocking fatality. The Coronor's Inquest. An inquest was held on Monday last by Mr. O. A. Edwards, P.M., Coroner, at the residence of Mr. H. E. Carlisle, Murragamba, near Ulan, on the bodies of Albert Ernest Archer and Robert Stewart Bailey, who had met their death by lightning stroke on the previous day.

James Loughrey deposed: I am a grazier, and reside at Ulan. Yesterday afternoon, about half-past two, I was riding, and at the first gate of Mr. Carlisle's place I saw two horses lying dead. They were lying on their sides, with their backs to each other. I also saw the two deceased, Albert Ernest Archer and Robert Stewart Bailey, lying near the horses. I have known both of the deceased since they were school boys. Archer was lying on his back alongside of the horse. Bailey was lying between the two horses, with one foot in the stirrup. I saw Bailey's shirt and vest burning, and I put the fire out. It was just about starting into a flame when I got there. There was nothing that I could see burning about Archer. As far as I could see both bodies were dead, also the horses. There had been some very heavy lightning just before I saw the deceased. The lightning appeared very close. After putting out the fire on Bailey's clothes I came on to Mr. Carlisle's place. I saw Mr. Carlisle. He went away and got assistance, and three men and myself went up and carried the bodies down to Mr. Carlisle's place. The conclusion I came to was that the deceased and their horses had been struck by lightning and killed.

Harold Edgar Carlisle deposed: I am a farmer, and reside at Murragamba, near Ulan. Yesterday I was at my place about 2.30 p.m., when there was a thunderstorm, the lightning being vivid and appeared to be very close. James Loughrey came to my place about 2.30 p.m. He said: " There are two horses, also two men, struck dead by lightning at your gate." I went away and got assistance to shift the bodies to my place. First I met Archer's father coming out of a shed of mine, where he had taken shelter from the storm, and I told him there were two men and two horses lying dead at my gate. We went up, and I saw the two deceased lying dead. We made very little examination. They were quite dead. The father of Archer went to his own place, and I went for more assistance to Mr. George Carr's, and got Henry Carr, William Carr, and James Loughrey. I assisted them to bring the bodies to my place. Archer was lying on his back with his head towards the horse's feet, one foot being on the horse's shoulder. Bailey was lying between the two horses, one foot being in the stirrup. Bailey was badly burnt on the shoulders and neck. I could see no marks on Archer except one on his forehead, which may have been caused by the mare drawing her hind leg up. It was just a skin mark. On Archer's horse I noticed a mark down the back as if the hair had been singed. Archer's saddle cloth had a hole burnt in it, apparently quite freshly done. I could not see any marks on Bailey's horse, but on the seat of Bailey's saddle I noticed two small holes freshly burned in. Close to where the bodies of deceased were I noticed a dry box tree, one that had been struck by lightning, about 50 or 60 yards off. Apparently they were just through the gate when they were struck by lightning. I saw them both alive about a quarter of an hour before. James Loughrey came out and told me they had been watering their cattle at my well. When I saw them they were apparently hale and hearty. In my opinion they were killed by the lightning.

William Gulley Archer deposed: I am a laborer, and reside at Murragamba, near Ulan. I have seen the dead body of Albert Ernest Archer, and it is that of my son. I left him at home yesterday morning, about 8.30 a.m., in the best of health. A storm came on about 2.30 p.m., and I took shelter in a shed of Mr. Carlisle's, who told me two men had been struck by lightning, and when I went up I found one of the deceased to be my son. Both bodies were quite dead, and so were the horses. My son was born at Murragamba, and was 18 years of age on the 27th of last May. He is not possessed of any property.

James Bailey deposed: I am a laborer, and reside at Murragamba, near Ulan. I have seen the dead bodies of deceased. One of them is my son, Robert Stewart Bailey. He was 20 years of age on 24th last October. He was born at Buckaroo, near Mudgee. I last saw him alive at 12 o'clock yesterday. He was then in perfect health. He has no property.

The Coroner's finding was: "That Albert Ernest Archer and Robert Stewart Bailey were struck by lightning and killed at Murragamba, near Ulan, on Sunday, 26th January, 1908."

Mudgee Guardian, Thursday 30 January 1908, p. 17. Harold Carlisle Lightning

Birth of a daughterDulcie M Carlisle
1910 (aged 42 years)

Marriage of a childJames EdmundsGrace Elizabeth CarlisleView this family
1920 (aged 52 years)

Harvester April 23, 1931 (aged 63 years)

Note: Harvester Case

Harvester Case Harold E. Carlisle, Murragamba, claimed £21 from Herbert J. King, Bylong, for goods sold and delivered and money lent. Defendant set up a cross action, claiming certain considerations for alleged breach of agreement. Mr. S. Jamieson, instructed by Mr. R. R. B. Hickson, appeared for claimant, and Mr. E. M. Martin, by Mr G. Spring, for defendant. The following jury was empannelled: G. W. Muller, C. K. Cox, J. I. Randell and W. Walsh. Mr. Jamieson, in outlining the case stated that his client sold, through Mara Bros., Mudgee, a second-hand harvester to the defendant. The price agreed upon was £20. King also agreed to pay the agent's commission (£1). The harvester was taken to Wollar by claimant, and King took delivery at that place. At a later date King intimated that the machine was not operating satisfactorily, and eventually he stated that he would claim some recompense for loss sustained to inability to harvest his crop. Carlisle made a visit of inspection, and agreed to pay for parts which he considered would fit the harvester for efficient work. Further Carlisle said he was willing to take back the harvester to avoid possible trouble. The machine was not returned, nor had his client received any payment. Harold Edgar Carlisle detailed the procedure which led up to the sale. He had received no payment for the harvester. He paid the £1 commission to the selling agents. To Mr Martin: I offered to take back the harvester to avoid court trouble. King complained of the chain on the machine breaking. He took me to Bylong to inspect the machine, I agreed to a proposal that a Mr. Davis be requested to overhaul the harvester. I agreed to pay reasonable costs in procuring and fitting new parts. The machine had been in my possession for some 12 years, but had not done a great deal of work. William Quinlan, Wollar, gave evidence that Carlisle left the machine on his property, and that King took delivery. Alan Mara, Mudgee, gave evidence that in August last the harvester was placed in his hands for sale. King, after inspection, agreed to purchase for £20. Carlisle agreed to deliver the machine at Wollar, providing King paid the commission. Later Carlisle paid the commission. To Mr Martin: Told King the harvester was in good order. After the sale defendant told me the chain continued to break, and asked me to arrange for Carlisle to go out and put it in order. Herbert Joseph King, Bylong, said that he was led to believe that the harvester was in good order. He was prepared to give £20 for it if it was as represented. After taking delivery a new chain was fitted, but it broke, and continued breaking. Carlisle later visited the property of witness, but could not account for the trouble. After an inspection Mr. Davis said that a bearing was in a worn condition, and recommended a new bearing and sprocket wheel.. Carlisle agreed to pay the cost of repairs so long as they did not go beyond the price he was asking for the harvester. Later new drum spikes and other parts were fitted, but the chain continued to give trouble. As a result of the faulty, working of the machine he was unable to take off the crop. He did not attempt to get another harvester when he found the one he had was not working effectively. He had not the means of procuring one. There were 40 acres under wheat and oats, and he only harvested about seven acres of oats. To Mr. Jamison: I sold the oats for 2/- a bushel. Don't know what profit I made per bag. Knew the chain was broken when I inspected the machine. Heard a Mr. Carr say he would buy the harvester if he had the money. Herbert Davis, Bylong, said he inspected the machine and found the sprocket wheel defective. Certain parts were ordered and fitted. Stanley King, Bylong, said he saw Carlisle endeavoring to fix the chain on the harvester. He admitted that he did not know what was the matter with it. Walter Samuel Parkins said he assisted King in the harvesting work, which could not be finished owing to the defects in the machine. Mrs. Evelyn King said she heard Carlisle tell her husband to have repairs effected as long as they did not cost more than he was asking for the machine. George Carr, Marraganba, gave evidence to the effect that the harvester had been working on his property, and gave satisfaction while new links were available for the chain. The harvester was in good condition barring the chain, when it left his place. Harold Edgar Carlisle (recalled) said the harvester was in good working order when he took it to Wollar. King told witness at a later date that he thought he could manage with the machine. He received accounts for repairs running into about £6. Lengthy addresses were delivered by counsel, and after the Judge's summing up the jury retired, later returning with a verdict for plaintiff for £21. In the set off claim defendant was allowed £7 6s cost of repairs effected to the machine. Mudgee Guardian, Thursday 23 April 1931, p. 3. Harold Carlisle Harvester

Papworth September 7, 1933 (aged 65 years)

Note: TEACHER'S COMPLAINT

TEACHER'S COMPLAINT

Alleged Assault ALLEGING that he had been struck on the face and called a liar, Herbert V. Papworth, of Ulan, at Mudgee Police Court on Monday charged Harold E. Carlisle, also of Ulan, with assault. Defendant pleaded not guilty, and although Mr. W. Britz, P.M., found the offence proved, he dismissed the information and declined to convict, under section 556a of the Crimes Act (1900). Papworth, a teacher, stated that on 21st August he went over to the property of his late father, of which he was the administrator, and which adjourned Carlisle's property. He and his brother were trenching for the erection of netting. Defendant approached them, and there was some disagreement about the amount of netting each party was to do. During the discussion defendant struck plaintiff on the side of the face with his open hand and called him a liar. The blow knocked plaintiff off his balance. Defendant also accused plaintiff's brother of poisoning his dog. Plaintiff added that there was no blood where he was struck, nor was he incapacitated at all. George Papworth, plaintiff's brother, gave corroborative evidence. Harold Edward Carlisle said that there was an argument about the fencing and that the Papworths began to act like "wild men." He put his hand on plaintiff's shoulder and just touched his face. Plaintiff's brother pulled defendant back and adopted a fighting attitude. Defendant never hit plaintiff. The P.M. entered a verdict as mentioned above. Mr. R. D. Bawden appeared for the plaintiff and Mr. B. Hickson for the defendant. Mudgee Guardian, Thursday 7 September 1933, p. 3. Harold Carlisle Papworth

Death May 16, 1935 (aged 67 years)
Note: DEATH

DEATH

THE death occurred at the Gulgong Hospital last Thursday of Mr. E. Carlisle, of Ulan, who had been a patient in the institution for over two months. He was a highly respected resident of the Ulan district. Mudgee Guardian, Thursday 23 May 1935, p. 12. Harold Carlisle Death

In memoriam May 14, 1936 (11 months after death)

Note: IN MEMORIAM

IN MEMORIAM

CARLISLE - In loving memory of our dear husband and father, Harold Edgar Carlisle, who departed this life on 16th May, 1935, aged 67 years. Peacefully sleeping and resting, Life's weary trials and suffering past; In silence he suffered, in patience he bore, Till God called him home, to suffer no more. Inserted by his loving wife and family. Mudgee Guardian, Thursday 14 May 1936, p. 4. Harold Carlisle In memoriam

Family with Annie Jane Byers
himself
18681935
Birth: 1868
Death: May 16, 1935Gulgong District Hospital, Gulgong, New South Wales, Australia
wife
18771962
Birth: 1877
Death: March 20, 1962Mudgee District Hospital, Mudgee, New South Wales, Australia
daughter
5 years
son
19001977
Birth: 1900 32 23
Death: December 21, 1977Mudgee District Hospital, Mudgee, New South Wales, Australia
4 years
son
3 years
daughter
19051938
Birth: 1905 37 28
Death: April 26, 1938Mudgee, New South Wales, Australia
3 years
son
19071965
Birth: 1907 39 30
Death: June 29, 1965Mudgee District Hospital, Mudgee, New South Wales, Australia
4 years
daughter
daughter
Private
Lightning

Struck by Lightning.

Shocking fatality. The Coronor's Inquest. An inquest was held on Monday last by Mr. O. A. Edwards, P.M., Coroner, at the residence of Mr. H. E. Carlisle, Murragamba, near Ulan, on the bodies of Albert Ernest Archer and Robert Stewart Bailey, who had met their death by lightning stroke on the previous day.

James Loughrey deposed: I am a grazier, and reside at Ulan. Yesterday afternoon, about half-past two, I was riding, and at the first gate of Mr. Carlisle's place I saw two horses lying dead. They were lying on their sides, with their backs to each other. I also saw the two deceased, Albert Ernest Archer and Robert Stewart Bailey, lying near the horses. I have known both of the deceased since they were school boys. Archer was lying on his back alongside of the horse. Bailey was lying between the two horses, with one foot in the stirrup. I saw Bailey's shirt and vest burning, and I put the fire out. It was just about starting into a flame when I got there. There was nothing that I could see burning about Archer. As far as I could see both bodies were dead, also the horses. There had been some very heavy lightning just before I saw the deceased. The lightning appeared very close. After putting out the fire on Bailey's clothes I came on to Mr. Carlisle's place. I saw Mr. Carlisle. He went away and got assistance, and three men and myself went up and carried the bodies down to Mr. Carlisle's place. The conclusion I came to was that the deceased and their horses had been struck by lightning and killed.

Harold Edgar Carlisle deposed: I am a farmer, and reside at Murragamba, near Ulan. Yesterday I was at my place about 2.30 p.m., when there was a thunderstorm, the lightning being vivid and appeared to be very close. James Loughrey came to my place about 2.30 p.m. He said: " There are two horses, also two men, struck dead by lightning at your gate." I went away and got assistance to shift the bodies to my place. First I met Archer's father coming out of a shed of mine, where he had taken shelter from the storm, and I told him there were two men and two horses lying dead at my gate. We went up, and I saw the two deceased lying dead. We made very little examination. They were quite dead. The father of Archer went to his own place, and I went for more assistance to Mr. George Carr's, and got Henry Carr, William Carr, and James Loughrey. I assisted them to bring the bodies to my place. Archer was lying on his back with his head towards the horse's feet, one foot being on the horse's shoulder. Bailey was lying between the two horses, one foot being in the stirrup. Bailey was badly burnt on the shoulders and neck. I could see no marks on Archer except one on his forehead, which may have been caused by the mare drawing her hind leg up. It was just a skin mark. On Archer's horse I noticed a mark down the back as if the hair had been singed. Archer's saddle cloth had a hole burnt in it, apparently quite freshly done. I could not see any marks on Bailey's horse, but on the seat of Bailey's saddle I noticed two small holes freshly burned in. Close to where the bodies of deceased were I noticed a dry box tree, one that had been struck by lightning, about 50 or 60 yards off. Apparently they were just through the gate when they were struck by lightning. I saw them both alive about a quarter of an hour before. James Loughrey came out and told me they had been watering their cattle at my well. When I saw them they were apparently hale and hearty. In my opinion they were killed by the lightning.

William Gulley Archer deposed: I am a laborer, and reside at Murragamba, near Ulan. I have seen the dead body of Albert Ernest Archer, and it is that of my son. I left him at home yesterday morning, about 8.30 a.m., in the best of health. A storm came on about 2.30 p.m., and I took shelter in a shed of Mr. Carlisle's, who told me two men had been struck by lightning, and when I went up I found one of the deceased to be my son. Both bodies were quite dead, and so were the horses. My son was born at Murragamba, and was 18 years of age on the 27th of last May. He is not possessed of any property.

James Bailey deposed: I am a laborer, and reside at Murragamba, near Ulan. I have seen the dead bodies of deceased. One of them is my son, Robert Stewart Bailey. He was 20 years of age on 24th last October. He was born at Buckaroo, near Mudgee. I last saw him alive at 12 o'clock yesterday. He was then in perfect health. He has no property.

The Coroner's finding was: "That Albert Ernest Archer and Robert Stewart Bailey were struck by lightning and killed at Murragamba, near Ulan, on Sunday, 26th January, 1908."

Mudgee Guardian, Thursday 30 January 1908, p. 17. Harold Carlisle Lightning

Harvester

Harvester Case Harold E. Carlisle, Murragamba, claimed £21 from Herbert J. King, Bylong, for goods sold and delivered and money lent. Defendant set up a cross action, claiming certain considerations for alleged breach of agreement. Mr. S. Jamieson, instructed by Mr. R. R. B. Hickson, appeared for claimant, and Mr. E. M. Martin, by Mr G. Spring, for defendant. The following jury was empannelled: G. W. Muller, C. K. Cox, J. I. Randell and W. Walsh. Mr. Jamieson, in outlining the case stated that his client sold, through Mara Bros., Mudgee, a second-hand harvester to the defendant. The price agreed upon was £20. King also agreed to pay the agent's commission (£1). The harvester was taken to Wollar by claimant, and King took delivery at that place. At a later date King intimated that the machine was not operating satisfactorily, and eventually he stated that he would claim some recompense for loss sustained to inability to harvest his crop. Carlisle made a visit of inspection, and agreed to pay for parts which he considered would fit the harvester for efficient work. Further Carlisle said he was willing to take back the harvester to avoid possible trouble. The machine was not returned, nor had his client received any payment. Harold Edgar Carlisle detailed the procedure which led up to the sale. He had received no payment for the harvester. He paid the £1 commission to the selling agents. To Mr Martin: I offered to take back the harvester to avoid court trouble. King complained of the chain on the machine breaking. He took me to Bylong to inspect the machine, I agreed to a proposal that a Mr. Davis be requested to overhaul the harvester. I agreed to pay reasonable costs in procuring and fitting new parts. The machine had been in my possession for some 12 years, but had not done a great deal of work. William Quinlan, Wollar, gave evidence that Carlisle left the machine on his property, and that King took delivery. Alan Mara, Mudgee, gave evidence that in August last the harvester was placed in his hands for sale. King, after inspection, agreed to purchase for £20. Carlisle agreed to deliver the machine at Wollar, providing King paid the commission. Later Carlisle paid the commission. To Mr Martin: Told King the harvester was in good order. After the sale defendant told me the chain continued to break, and asked me to arrange for Carlisle to go out and put it in order. Herbert Joseph King, Bylong, said that he was led to believe that the harvester was in good order. He was prepared to give £20 for it if it was as represented. After taking delivery a new chain was fitted, but it broke, and continued breaking. Carlisle later visited the property of witness, but could not account for the trouble. After an inspection Mr. Davis said that a bearing was in a worn condition, and recommended a new bearing and sprocket wheel.. Carlisle agreed to pay the cost of repairs so long as they did not go beyond the price he was asking for the harvester. Later new drum spikes and other parts were fitted, but the chain continued to give trouble. As a result of the faulty, working of the machine he was unable to take off the crop. He did not attempt to get another harvester when he found the one he had was not working effectively. He had not the means of procuring one. There were 40 acres under wheat and oats, and he only harvested about seven acres of oats. To Mr. Jamison: I sold the oats for 2/- a bushel. Don't know what profit I made per bag. Knew the chain was broken when I inspected the machine. Heard a Mr. Carr say he would buy the harvester if he had the money. Herbert Davis, Bylong, said he inspected the machine and found the sprocket wheel defective. Certain parts were ordered and fitted. Stanley King, Bylong, said he saw Carlisle endeavoring to fix the chain on the harvester. He admitted that he did not know what was the matter with it. Walter Samuel Parkins said he assisted King in the harvesting work, which could not be finished owing to the defects in the machine. Mrs. Evelyn King said she heard Carlisle tell her husband to have repairs effected as long as they did not cost more than he was asking for the machine. George Carr, Marraganba, gave evidence to the effect that the harvester had been working on his property, and gave satisfaction while new links were available for the chain. The harvester was in good condition barring the chain, when it left his place. Harold Edgar Carlisle (recalled) said the harvester was in good working order when he took it to Wollar. King told witness at a later date that he thought he could manage with the machine. He received accounts for repairs running into about £6. Lengthy addresses were delivered by counsel, and after the Judge's summing up the jury retired, later returning with a verdict for plaintiff for £21. In the set off claim defendant was allowed £7 6s cost of repairs effected to the machine. Mudgee Guardian, Thursday 23 April 1931, p. 3. Harold Carlisle Harvester

Papworth

TEACHER'S COMPLAINT

Alleged Assault ALLEGING that he had been struck on the face and called a liar, Herbert V. Papworth, of Ulan, at Mudgee Police Court on Monday charged Harold E. Carlisle, also of Ulan, with assault. Defendant pleaded not guilty, and although Mr. W. Britz, P.M., found the offence proved, he dismissed the information and declined to convict, under section 556a of the Crimes Act (1900). Papworth, a teacher, stated that on 21st August he went over to the property of his late father, of which he was the administrator, and which adjourned Carlisle's property. He and his brother were trenching for the erection of netting. Defendant approached them, and there was some disagreement about the amount of netting each party was to do. During the discussion defendant struck plaintiff on the side of the face with his open hand and called him a liar. The blow knocked plaintiff off his balance. Defendant also accused plaintiff's brother of poisoning his dog. Plaintiff added that there was no blood where he was struck, nor was he incapacitated at all. George Papworth, plaintiff's brother, gave corroborative evidence. Harold Edward Carlisle said that there was an argument about the fencing and that the Papworths began to act like "wild men." He put his hand on plaintiff's shoulder and just touched his face. Plaintiff's brother pulled defendant back and adopted a fighting attitude. Defendant never hit plaintiff. The P.M. entered a verdict as mentioned above. Mr. R. D. Bawden appeared for the plaintiff and Mr. B. Hickson for the defendant. Mudgee Guardian, Thursday 7 September 1933, p. 3. Harold Carlisle Papworth

Death

DEATH

THE death occurred at the Gulgong Hospital last Thursday of Mr. E. Carlisle, of Ulan, who had been a patient in the institution for over two months. He was a highly respected resident of the Ulan district. Mudgee Guardian, Thursday 23 May 1935, p. 12. Harold Carlisle Death

In memoriam

IN MEMORIAM

CARLISLE - In loving memory of our dear husband and father, Harold Edgar Carlisle, who departed this life on 16th May, 1935, aged 67 years. Peacefully sleeping and resting, Life's weary trials and suffering past; In silence he suffered, in patience he bore, Till God called him home, to suffer no more. Inserted by his loving wife and family. Mudgee Guardian, Thursday 14 May 1936, p. 4. Harold Carlisle In memoriam